An excerpt from Appendix A: "A needful reminder of the price of religious liberty" in our latest book, The British Particular Baptists, Volume 5

An excerpt from Appendix A: "A needful reminder of the price of religious liberty" in our latest book, The British Particular Baptists, Volume 5

27th May 2020

Actual photograph of the dungeon at Warwick, England, where religious dissenters were imprisoned for conscience’ sake during the Restoration period of the Stuart King Charles II, 1660-1685. The octagonal room was 18′ 10″ underground (thus there was no sunlight) and measured about 21 feet in diameter. “In the middle is a cesspool, and on one side a gutter, through which water for drinking purposes flowed. Round the cesspool are eight stout posts, in each of which was a strong staple.” The prisoners “lay with their feet chained towards the cesspool, and a long chain ran through the staples, and through a link of each prisoner’s chain, and was then carried up the steps leading down to the dungeon, and passed through the inner door, and padlocked.”