The essay on Benjamin Beddome (1717-1795), written by Michael A. G. Haykin, is the 11th subject in our latest book, British Particular Baptists, volume 4.

The essay on Benjamin Beddome (1717-1795), written by Michael A. G. Haykin, is the 11th subject in our latest book, British Particular Baptists, volume 4.

9th Jan 2019

The final three decades of Beddome’s life were fraught with earthly trials. . . . his eldest son, John, died at the age of fifteen. A second son, Benjamin (born 1753), died in 1778 of what Rippon calls “a putrid fever.” It is notable that the very day the younger Benjamin died, his father, little suspecting the news he would receive the next morning, wrote the following hymn to be sung at the close of the morning service that day.

My times of sorrow, and of joy,
Great God, are in thy hand;
My choicest comforts come from thee,
And go at thy command.
If thou should’st take them all away,
Yet would I not repine;
Before they were possess’d by me,
They were entirely thine.
Nor would I drop a murmuring word,
Tho’ the whole world were gone,
But seek enduring happiness
In thee, and thee alone.
What is the world with all it’s store?
’Tis but a bitter-sweet;
When I attempt to pluck the rose
A pricking thorn I meet.
Here perfect bliss can ne’er be found,
The honey’s mix’d with gall;
Midst changing scenes and dying friends,
Be thou my all in all.

The picture is of the old Baptist chapel at Bourton-on-the-Water where Beddome pastored for 55 years.